VOL. NO: 52      DATE:
 
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AFRICAN ECHO NEWS

UK pupils to benefit from linkages with schools in the developing world

SCHOOLCHILDREN will gain a better understanding of the world and the UK’s place in it, thanks to a new pocket guide to building links between schools in the UK and the developing world, Chancellor Gordon Brown and International Development Secretary Hilary Benn have announced.

The ‘World Classroom’ pocket guide for global school partnerships is part of the Government’s £8.5 billion investment to ensure free education for all children in the world’s poorest countries within the next 10 years.

Almost 80 million primary school aged children in the developing world are denied an education.

Education is vital in the fight against extreme poverty - it enables people in poor countries to fulfil their potential and combat the spread of diseases such as HIV and AIDS. Getting children in the developing world into school will cost each person in the rich countries of the world just two pence a day.

The Department for International Development works with poor countries to develop long term education and financial plans so they can train teachers, pay salaries and provide and maintain school facilities and equipment.

Gordon Brown said: "The right to education could be the greatest gift the rich nations can make to the developing world.

“That is why I want every parent, student and school in Britain and the developed world to become campaigners calling on governments round the world to ensure that in our generation every child is finally given access to schooling. "

Hilary Benn said: “Education helps transform lives, banishing ignorance and improving opportunities.

“Building links between schools across the world, bringing pupils together, sharing experiences and learning will help us tackle the challenge of providing education for all.”

Through DFID’s existing Global School Partnership Programme, the world is already being brought into the classroom for UK pupils.

In Sussex, Hove Park Pupils have been using digital technology to compare and discuss their day to day lives with pupils in Ghana’s Cape Coast schools. By exchanging ideas and learning about differences as well as similarities, pupils at Hove are improving their understanding of subjects such as History, Citizenship and Information Communication Technology.

Judy Cooper, Head of History at Hove Park who took part in a teacher exchange in Ghana said: “I saw the castles where slaves were kept before transportation. This has really helped my discussions with year nine students and led us to talk about human trafficking as a contemporary issue as well as a historical fact.”

DFID, working with Education Departments in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland, aims to enable more partnerships, like those between Hove Park and schools in Ghana, to flourish. Later this year DFID will be supporting regional roadshows for schools to help explain what they can do to establish, build and maintain links with a school in the developing world.

The pocket guide ‘The World Classroom’, offers advice, support and online teaching resources for schools who want to join DFID’s Global School Partnerships Programme to link with schools in the developing world. It is available for downloading at www.dfid.gov.uk/news/files/s chool-partnerships.asp or to order a copy please ring 0845 300 4100.

Did you know that?...

80 million primary school aged children in the developing world are denied an education. a school in Mozambique has 4200 pupils but only 22 classrooms. Children receive education for just three hours a day, attending in separate shifts, with those on the last shift sometimes being sent home because it gets dark and there is no light to teach by.

girls who are educated have better mortality and nutrition. In Tanzania 9 out of 10 children now go to school thanks to UK money which has been used to abolish user fees that deny poor children an education.

a woman who has had the chance to go to school is 50% more likely to have her child immunised;

women who have an extra year in school increase their future income by 10-20% education is vital in the fight against extreme poverty in developing countries as it enables people to fulfil their potential and combat the spread of diseases such as HIV and AIDS.

getting children in the developing world into school will cost each person in the rich countries of the world just two pence a day.

in the future, one in four jobs will be related to international trade.

The Department for International Development works with poor countries to develop long term education plans and long term predictable financing they need to train teachers, pay salaries and to provide and maintain school facilities and equipment.

The UK Government is committed to a £8.5 billion 10 year agreement with developing countries to help finance their education plans.

 

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